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CALIFORNIA'S PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP PROGRAMS

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EXTENDED PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY

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Agricultural Spraying

CONSUMER RESPONSIBILITY

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OTHER MATERIAL CATEGORIES
(NO MANDATED PROGRAMS)

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Learn about active bills related to extended producer responsibility and more on our Legislation Page

CA EXTENDED PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY PROGRAMS

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Responsible Battery Recycling Act of 2022

On September 16, 2022, Governor Newsom signed into law AB 2440 (Irwin) which established the Responsible Battery Recycle Act of 2022 and created an battery EPR program in California. Under this program, producers are required to establish a stewardship program for the collection and recycling of covered batteries. The definition of a covered battery includes any loose battery that is either sold separately from a product or that is designed to be easily removed from a product, and batteries that are packed with, but not installed in, the product that the battery is intended to power. Additionally, any retailer with five or more locations in CA shall make all their locations serve as permanent collection sites for covered batteries, and participate as part of a stewardship program. 

 

Learn more on our Products Page, and the CalRecycle Batteries Webpage. Sign up for CalRecycle's listservs or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Used Oil Recycling Enhancement Act

In 1991, Governor Wilson signed into law AB 2076 (Sher) which established the Used Oil Recycling Enhancement Act to discourage the illegal disposal of used oil. On September 2009, Governor Schwarzenegger signed SB 546 (Lowenthal) that restructured the lubricating oil recycling fee and the used oil recycling incentive payment system. The bill streamlining the used oil grant programs, promoting the production and use of re-refined oil, made changes to the used oil certified collection center program, and made various changes to the handling and management of used oil.

Learn more by visiting the CalRecycle Used Oil WebpageSign up for CalRecycle's listservs​ or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Product Recall Safety & Protection Act 

On September 29, 2009, Governor Schwarzenegger signed into law AB 1860 (Huffman): Unsafe products: recall or warning which established the Product Recall Safety & Protection Act. The act prohibits any commercial dealer, manufacturer, importer, distributor, wholesaler, or retailer from manufacturing, remanufacturing, distributing, selling at wholesale or retail, contracting to sell or resell, leasing, or subletting, or otherwise placing into the stream of commerce, a product that is unsafe, knowing that the product is unsafe.

 

Sign up for CalRecycle's listservs​ or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Plastic Pollution Prevention and Packaging Producer Responsibility Act

On June 30, 2022, Governor Newsom signed into law SB 54 (Allen): Solid waste: reporting, packaging, and plastic food service ware which established the Plastic Pollution Prevention and Packaging Producer Responsibility Act. Covered materials under this act include certain single-use packaging and plastic single-use food service ware. Under the act, producers of single-use packaging and plastic single-use food service ware to ensure that those products sold, distributed, or imported into the state are either recyclable or compostable. Additionally, it requires that 65% of plastic covered material to be recycled on and after January 1, 2032.

 

Learn more by visiting the CalRecycle Plastic Packaging WebpageSign up for CalRecycle's listservs​ or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Pharmaceutical and Sharps Waste Stewardship

On September 30, 2018, Governor Brown signed into law SB 212 (Jackson): Solid waste: pharmaceutical and sharps waste stewardship which created the nation's first EPR program for both medicine and sharps together. Today, California's industry-run statewide stewardship programs that provide safe and convenient disposal options for pharmaceutical and home-generated sharps waste at no cost to the consumer.

Read the entire story of SB 212 - bringing producer funded medicine and sharps disposal to California.

California Drug Take-Back Program

Funded by the California Department of Health Care Services' MAT Expansion Project and developed and administered in partnership with CPSC, the program's goal is to increase the disposal of unwanted medicines across the state of California. Collection bins have been and continue to be placed throughout the state for the express purpose of disposing unwanted medicines. 

Learn more on our Products Page, and the CalRecycle Pharmaceutical and Sharps Webpage. Sign up for CalRecycle's listservs or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Thermostat Stewardship

On September 29, 2008, Governor Schwarzenegger signed into law AB 2347 (Ruskin): Mercury Thermostat Collection, the first extended producer responsibility bill to become law in California. AB 2347 established the Mercury Thermostats Collection Act which requires heating and air conditioning (HVAC) wholesalers to accept mercury thermostats from the public free-of-charge, and contractors who remove mercury thermostats to recycle them. In 2021, Governor Newsom signed into law AB 707 (Quirk), establishing the Mercury Thermostat Collection Act of 2021 which requires manufacturer of mercury-added thermostats to develop and implement a program for the collection, transportation, recycling, and disposal of out-of-service mercury-added thermostats. This was followed by AB 732 (Quirk) that Governor Newsom signed into law in 2022 which impose the sales ban on the thermostats of manufacturers not in compliance with the act and requires manufacturers to provide collection bins to wholesalers for out-of-service mercury-added thermostats

 

Learn more on our Products Page, and the DTSC Mercury Thermostat Webpage. Sign up for DTSC's listservs or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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CALIFORNIA'S CONSUMER RESPONSIBILITY PROGRAMS

Beverage Containers 

In 1986, AB 2020 (Margolin) was passed to create the California Beverage Container Recycling and Little Reduction Act and establish the California Beverage Container Recycling Program. Since its passage, various bills have been signed into law to improve the program including AB 793 (Ting) which establishes recycled content standards for plastic beverage containers subject to the California Refund Value (CRV). In 2022, Governor Newsom signed SB 1013 (Atkins), which added wine and distilled spirits into the program.  Learn more on our Products Page, and the CalRecycle Beverage Containers Webpage. Sign up for CalRecycle's listservs or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Carpet

On September 30, 2010, AB 2398 (Perez) was signed into law and established the first product stewardship legislation to support the recycling of carpet under the administration of the Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE). To improve the California carpet stewardship program, AB 1158 (Chu) was signed in 2017, followed by AB 729 (Chu) in 2019. The bill added the requirement that differential assessments take into account the financial burden that a particular carpet material has on the stewardship program, and the amount of post-consumer recycled content contained in a particular carpet. This national precedent of "eco-modulated fees" which shows to consumers which products are more recyclable and less toxic with a lower fee.  Learn more on our Products Page, and the CalRecycle Carpet Webpage. Sign up for CalRecycle's listservs or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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E-Waste

On September 16, 2022, Governor Newsom signed into law SB 1215 (Newman), which expanded on the Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003: covered battery-embedded products. The bill requires a consumer, on and after January 1, 2026, to pay a covered battery-embedded waste recycling fee in an amount established by CalRecycle upon the purchase of a new or refurbished covered battery-embedded product.  Learn more on our Products Page, and the CalRecycle E-Waste Webpage. Sign up for CalRecycle's listservs or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Mattresses

In 2013, SB 254 (Hancock) was enacted to require the industry to create a statewide recycling program to increase the recovery and recycling of mattresses at their end-of-use. The Program is funded through a $10.50 recycling fee collected from consumers at the point-of-sale of a mattress or box spring. SB 1274 (Hancock) was passed in 2014 to provide additional clarity regarding definitions, report submittals, and record keeping requirements, followed by AB 187 (Garcia) in 2019 to add further improvements to the mattress stewardship program.  Learn more on our Products Page, and the CalRecycle Mattress Webpage. Sign up for CalRecycle's listservs or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Paint

In 2010 AB 1343 (Huffman) was signed into law and created the California Paint Stewardship Program. Administered by PaintCare, the program has established over 800 collection sites throughout the state.  Learn more on our Products Page, and the CalRecycle Paint Webpage. Sign up for CalRecycle's listservs or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Tires

In 1989, AB 1989: Tire Recycling Act was passed to establish the Tire Recycling Program and the California Tire Recycling Management Fund. The act creates a fee on the sale of new tires. SB 876 (Escutia) was passed in 2000 to improve the California Tire Recycling Act.  Learn more on our Products Page, and the CalRecycle Tires Webpage. Sign up for CalRecycle's listservs or join CPSC for regular updates. 

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OTHER MATERIAL CATEGORIES (NO MANDATED PROGRAMS)

Gas Cylinders

One pound disposable propane gas cylinders (cylinders) power equipment used for camping, cooking, landscaping, heating, and a variety of other applications. There are 30 million cylinders sold in the U.S. each year and an estimate over four million in California alone. Cylinders are difficult to recycle and once discarded cannot be presumed to be empty. Even a small amount of propane gas under pressure is dangerous and presents a risk to sanitation workers. Learn more on our Products Page, and join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Textiles

The main source of textiles in municipal solid waste (MSW) is discarded clothing, although other smaller sources include furniture, carpets, tires, footwear, and other nondurable goods such as sheets and towels. The 2018 Waste Characterization Study estimates that nearly 1.2 million tons of textiles were discarded in California, not including other fiber products, like carpet. A recent study by the Ellen Macarthur Foundation indicates that our clothing consumption is increasing, while garment utilization is decreasing. In short, we are buying more clothing and disposing it more frequently. End-of-life management becomes a key element in creating a circular economy for textiles and clothing. Learn more on our Products Page, and join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Solar Panels

A solar panel converts the sun’s radiant energy into electricity using cells, called photovoltaic (PV) modules, and semiconductors. Each Photovoltaic panel has a life expectancy of 20-30 years. During their entire life cycle, from the production to their final disposal, considerable quantities of non-renewable resources generate pollution and waste with a high environmental impact. As PV panels are being removed from residential and commercial installations, recycling and proper end-of-life management becomes an increasingly imminent problem. Learn more on our Products Page, and join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Fluorescents 

Fluorescent lamps consume less electricity than conventional bulbs; however, mercury is the key element that makes them so efficient. Mercury is a toxin which can harm the nervous system, kidneys, and liver. Mercury residue in landfills forms methyl mercury gas, which is especially toxic. CalRecycle reports that an estimated 75 million fluorescent lamps and tubes are generated each year, which in total contains more than half a ton of mercury. Learn more on our Products Page, and join CPSC for regular updates. 

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Tobacco

Tobacco Product Waste (TPW) is the number 1 most littered product worldwide with an estimated 4.5 trillion cigarette butts entering the environment each year (Litter Free Planet, 2009). TPW includes cigarettes, cigars, cigarillos, and electronic smoking devices and components. When TPW is discarded in the environment, it leaches thousands of chemicals, including 50 different carcinogenic chemicals (Puls, 2011). Learn more on our Products Page, and join CPSC for regular updates. 

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